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Radical Abandonment

“The idea of the Gospel was a totally different logic of emancipation, of justice, of freedom. Within a pagan world, injustice meant a disturbance of natural order. In pagan traditions, justice was defined in what today we would call fascistic terms, each in his or her place in the hierarchy. There’s the benevolent father, women do their job taking care of the family, workers do their work and so on. Each at their post so that injustice equaled hubris, when one of the elements wanted to be born (to break away). And so, in a violent way, natural balance needed to be reestablished… But the message that the Gospel sends is precisely a radical abandonment of the idea of some kind of natural balance; the idea of Gospels and the part of sins is that freedom is zero. We begin from the zero point, which is the point of radical equality. Look at what St. Paul is writing and the metaphors he used. It’s a totally different world whose formal structure is that of radical revolution. Even in ancient Greece, you don’t find that—this idea that the world can be turned on its head, that we are not irreducibly bound by the chains of our past. The past can be erased; we can start from the zero point. This is the logic of emancipation… This is the good news that the Gospel means: you can do it, take the risk.” -Slavoj Zizek

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"Perhaps it is no wonder that women were first at the Cradle and last at the Cross. They had never known a man like this-there never has been another. A prophet and teacher who never nagged at them, never flattered or coaxed or persuaded; who never made arch jokes about them, never treated them as ‘The women, God help us!’ or ‘The ladies, God bless them!’ who rebuked without querulousness and praised without condemnation; who took their questions and arguments seriously; who never mapped out their sphere for them, never urged them to be more feminine or jeered at them for being female; who had no axe to grind and no uneasy male dignity to defend; who took them as he found them and was completely unselfconscious. There was no act, no sermon, no parable in the whole Gospel that borrows its pungency from female perversity; nobody could guess from the words and deeds of Jesus that there was anything “funny” about women’s nature."

— Dorothy Day (via thoughtstheological)y

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"Radical Catholics poured blood on the draft files. Then the Quakers said, ‘We’ll clog up your jails.’ It was wonderful. Jewish lawyers got them out of jail."

— Artist and activist James Turrell on the Interfaith Coalition of the anti-war movement. The full article is HERE

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"Christianity has to view any social and economic order that treats being or becoming rich as highly desirable as doing wrong to those who must not only accept its goals, but succeed in achieving them. Riches are, from a biblical point of view, an affliction, an almost insuperable obstacle to entering the kingdom of heaven. Capitalism is bad for those who succeed by its standards as well as for those who fail by them, something that many preachers and theologians have failed to recognize. And those Christians who have recognized it have often enough been at odds with the ecclesiastical as well as political and economic authorities."

— Alisdair MacIntyre, After Virtue (via theopoliticaldiscipleship)

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Embodied, Suffered

"The very act of contemplation – repeated, lived, embodied, suffered – is an act that, by grace, and over time, precisely inculcates mental patterns of un-mastery, welcomes the dark realm of the unconscious, opens up a radical attention to the other, and instigates an acute awareness of the messy entanglement of sexual desires and desire for God.”

—Sarah Coakley